Myles Lopez

Joined a year ago

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You Don't Know Js: Async & Performance
You Don't Know Js: Async & Performance
You Don't Know Js: Async & Performance by Kyle Simpson. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 70 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
Cybersecurity 101: What You Absolutely Must Know! - Volume 2: Learn JavaScript Threat Basics, USB Attacks, Easy Steps to Strong Cybersecurity, Defense ... Against Data Exfiltration and much more!
Cybersecurity 101: What You Absolutely Must Know! - Volume 2: Learn JavaScript Threat Basics, USB Attacks, Easy Steps to Strong Cybersecurity, Defense ... Against Data Exfiltration and much more!
Cybersecurity 101: What You Absolutely Must Know! - Volume 2: Learn JavaScript Threat Basics, USB Attacks, Easy Steps to Strong Cybersecurity, Defense ... Against Data Exfiltration and much more! by James Scott. Rated 3.8 out of 5 stars, with 3 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
TypeScript Quickly
TypeScript Quickly
TypeScript Quickly by Yakov Fain and Anton Moiseev. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
PHP & MySQL: The Missing Manual
PHP & MySQL: The Missing Manual
PHP & MySQL: The Missing Manual by Brett McLaughlin. Rated 3.6 out of 5 stars, with 41 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the mysql category.
Harry Potter og Halvblodsprinsen: Harry Potter 6
Harry Potter og Halvblodsprinsen: Harry Potter 6
Harry Potter og Halvblodsprinsen: Harry Potter 6 by J.K. Rowling, Torstein Bugge Høverstad - translator, et al.. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
Juntos ao Luar (Portuguese Edition)
Juntos ao Luar (Portuguese Edition)
Juntos ao Luar (Portuguese Edition) by Nicholas Sparks. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Ganglands: Brazil
Ganglands: Brazil
Ganglands: Brazil by Ross Kemp. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars, with 7 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Nah und Fern (German Edition)
Nah und Fern (German Edition)
Nah und Fern (German Edition) by Nicholas Sparks and Adelheid Zöfel. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars, with 32 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Feast of Fear: Conversations with Stephen King
Feast of Fear: Conversations with Stephen King
Feast of Fear: Conversations with Stephen King by Tim Underwood and Chuck Miller. Rated 3.3 out of 5 stars, with 3 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
THE WASTE LANDS ISBN: 0-452-26740-4
THE WASTE LANDS ISBN: 0-452-26740-4
THE WASTE LANDS ISBN: 0-452-26740-4 by KING STEPHEN and DAMERON NED. Rated 4.7 out of 5 stars, with 6 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Rabia / Rage (Best Seller)
Rabia / Rage (Best Seller)
Rabia / Rage (Best Seller) by Stephen King. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Java 9 for Programmers (Deitel Developer Series)
Java 9 for Programmers (Deitel Developer Series)
Java 9 for Programmers (Deitel Developer Series) by Paul J. Deitel and Harvey Deitel. Rated 4.8 out of 5 stars, with 29 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Java programming' category.
Outsider (Polish Edition)
Outsider (Polish Edition)
Outsider (Polish Edition) by Stephen King. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Wireless Web Development with PHP and WAP
Wireless Web Development with PHP and WAP
Wireless Web Development with PHP and WAP by Ray Rischpater. Rated 4.1 out of 5 stars, with 4 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Refactoring SQL Applications
Refactoring SQL Applications
Refactoring SQL Applications by Stephane Faroult and Pascal L'Hermite. Rated 3.4 out of 5 stars, with 8 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
Software Architectures: Advances and Applications
Software Architectures: Advances and Applications
Software Architectures: Advances and Applications by Leonor Barroca, Jon Hall, et al.. Rated 1 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Scala programming category.
Quick Master webpack Sokushu (Japanese Edition)
Quick Master webpack Sokushu (Japanese Edition)
フロント側の作業をしているとよく耳にするwebpack。
良く分からないけどqiitaとかググったページに乗ってるそれっぽいコードをコピペして動かしている貴方。

この本を読めば、なぜwebをpackする必要があるのか分かります。jsやvue.js, reactなとを解説する本は数多あれど、webpackだけに注力している本は凄く稀有ですので、買う価値があります。Kindle Unlimitedに入っているなら無料で読めるので、試し読みしてみて気に入ったら購入しましょう!
The Intelligent Investor: The Classic Best Seller on Value Investing
The Intelligent Investor: The Classic Best Seller on Value Investing
This is the best investment book that I have read and I am a veteran of many investment books having written one myself. In fact, The Intelligent Investor is probably the best investment book ever written. Good investing doesn't require a gigantic IQ, but it does need a proper state of mind, the intellectual framework for recognizing the truth and the ability to keep your emotions from eroding that framework. What I liked the best in the book was the numerous case studies which allowed me to work out my investment decisions on given stock situations and then see what subsequently happened to that stock. The subsequent discussions and the results proved that stock picking can be quite scientific and predictable. The book further proves that the investors worst enemy is often himself/herself. The fault Dear Brutus is not in our stocks but in ourselves for we are underlings. Enthusiasm might do well in other endeavors, but in Wall Street it almost invariably leads to disaster. In Wall Street it's the facts that count not wishful thinking or fantasy as so many have recently learned. Incidentally, I agree with Graham's definition: An investment is one which, upon analysis, promises safety of principal and an adequate return. Anything else is a speculation and should be avoided. Follow Graham and you might profit from the folly of others rather than participate in folly yourself.
The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone
The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone
I have mixed feelings on this book. But overall, I highly recommend it.

When I first heard of this book, I was really interested in reading it and pre-ordered it on Amazon – since I like to ready and study the history and development of technology and Silicon Valley. I read The One Device over the course of a few days. No doubt, this boo was released a week before the 10th anniversary of release of the first iPhone - Friday, June 29th, 2007, to generate interest and sales.

If you want *just* a history of the development of the first iPhone, this book may not be for you – except for the last chapter. If you want to know more about what made the iPhone possible and everything that lead up to the iPhone in a historical context, then you’ll definitely want to read this book. I just felt that the book could have been organized with more about Apple than a lot of isolated chapters with some Apple and iPhone history sprinkled in, where the best chapter on the development of the iPhone was saved for last. These lines from the last chapter succinctly encapsulates the essence of the book and the development of the iPhone:

“… The stars aligned. They also aligned with lithium-ion battery technology, and with the compacting of cameras. With the accretion of China’s skilled labor force, and the surfeit of cheaper metals around the world. The list goes on. “It’s not just a question of waking up one morning in 2006 and deciding that you’re going to build the iPhone; it’s a matter of making these nonintuitive investments and failed products and crazy experimentation – and being able to operate on this huge timescale … Most companies aren’t able to that. Apple almost wasn’t able to do that.”

The One Device tells the story of the development of the iPhone – but much more so, the confluence of ideas and technologies over time that made the iPhone possible.

The book starts off with Apple’s “Explore New Rich Interactions” (ENRI) group and initial experimentations of multi-touch before even thinking about the smartphone. Then a chapter into the history of the phone, electronic communications and the smartphone. Then on to a chapter (“Minephones”) on the sources of materials of smartphones. Then to Gorilla Glass. Then a chapter on the origins and work on multitouch over the decades.

Then back to a chapter on Apple (“Prototyping”).

Then back to the history of the battery and lithium battery and the origins of lithium. Then a chapter on Apple’s interest in the camera & image stabilization. Then a chapter back to the history of sensing motion (gyroscopes, GPS, accelerometers, etc). And onto a chapter on the ARM microprocessor (“Strong-ARMed”). Then a chapter on cellular network infrastructure.

Then back to Apple (“Enter the iPhone”), describing Apple’s thinking on developing a mobile phone, as iPod was taking off. Then to a side-tracked chapter and history of Siri (along with voice recognition, and artificial intelligence). I say side-tracked, since the original iPhone didn’t have Siri – which came out in the Fall of 2011 with the release of the iPhone 4S.

Then a chapter on Foxconn and the Chinese labor force that assembles the iPhone.

The back to Apple on how secretive it is as well as its marketing prowess (“Sellphone”).

Then back to China and description of the Chinese component ecosystem and aftermarket and black market for phones.

Then finally the last chapter of the book – the last 50 pages or so (out of 380 pages) – “The One Device” - is the meat of what I was looking for – getting more deeply into the details (as much as one could to a general reading audience).

Overall, I would describe The One Device as a book version of the history of the smartphone analogous to the 1996 three hour PBS television documentary about the PC industry titled, “Triumph of the Nerds” – which I often say, is the best three hours of television, or at least documentary television, ever made. If you’re really interested in the history of what made the iPhone possible, this is terrific primer.

Some other thoughts – this book really also looks at the cost of the iPhone, smartphone and consumer electronics in general – the mining material & labor cost, the factory worker & cellular tower worker cost, and the environmental cost.

And finally, the cost to the Apple employees who gave their lives for the iPhone:

As stated in the book, “His doctor, he says, gave him an ultimatum. Do these two things or risk dying – lose weight and quit [Apple]. Thirty-six people I worked with at Apple have died,” he says. “it is intense.”

That intensity is also likely the reason that the team that built the iPhone has since scattered to the winds. As of 2017, besides Jony Ive, none of the executive staff at Apple was seriously involved in creating the iPhone.”
The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford
The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford
The Making of Black Detroit is a wonderful book, even if the title is somewhat misleading. Beth Tompkins Bates examines the relationship between automaker Henry Ford and the African American in the years between the two World Wars. By the end of World War I, the Ford Motor Company had become a beacon for black migrants. Whatever his motives, Ford chose to open up jobs to black workers even when his competitors would not. Bates then carefully demonstrates how the relationship changed over time: how black workers moved from a position of loyalty (feigned or real) to a position of assertively standing up to Ford by working to bring the United Autoworkers into Ford's plants; Ford was vehemently anti-union and apparently counted on the presence of loyal black workers to keep the union out. Bates' work, however, suffers from some of the flaws of many academic texts: repetitive writing, jargon and an overuse of acronyms. And the title: Several monographs written in the last 30 years or so have described the "making" of Black Detroit (most notably Richard Thomas' Life for Us Is What We Make It), but Bates really doesn't address the development of the African American community. Her work more accurately could be titled African Americans and the Shadow of Henry Ford. This work, however, still will be of interest to those students of African American history, urban history and labor history.

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