Jenny Myers

Joined a year ago

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Angular in Action
Angular in Action
Angular in Action by Jeremy Wilken. Rated 3.4 out of 5 stars, with 9 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
Bearly Poetry A.E. Housman
Bearly Poetry A.E. Housman
Bearly Poetry A.E. Housman by K. A. Meade. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 2 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
The Choice (Movie Tie-In)
The Choice (Movie Tie-In)
The Choice (Movie Tie-In) by Nicholas Sparks. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 110 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
The Things We Leave Behind
The Things We Leave Behind
The Things We Leave Behind by Tanya Anne Crosby. Rated 3.9 out of 5 stars, with 576 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Fine Things: A Novel
Fine Things: A Novel
Fine Things: A Novel by Danielle Steel. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 165 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
My Pretty Pony
My Pretty Pony
My Pretty Pony by Stephen King and Barbara Kruger. Rated 4.8 out of 5 stars, with 10 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Professional PHP Programming
Professional PHP Programming
Professional PHP Programming by Jesus M. Castagnetto, Harish Rawat, et al.. Rated 3.7 out of 5 stars, with 55 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Magento PHP Developer’s Guide
Magento PHP Developer’s Guide
Magento PHP Developer’s Guide by Allan MacGregor. Rated 3.2 out of 5 stars, with 36 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Programmare con PHP 7 (Italian Edition)
Programmare con PHP 7 (Italian Edition)
Programmare con PHP 7 (Italian Edition) by Steve Prettyman. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars, with 9 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
PHP Project for Beginners
PHP Project for Beginners
PHP Project for Beginners by Vaishali Shah and Sharanam Shah. Rated 3.1 out of 5 stars, with 3 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
WordPress Complete - Sixth Edition
WordPress Complete - Sixth Edition
WordPress Complete - Sixth Edition by Karol Krol. Rated 4.1 out of 5 stars, with 7 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
SQL All-in-One Desk Reference For Dummies
SQL All-in-One Desk Reference For Dummies
SQL All-in-One Desk Reference For Dummies by Allen G. Taylor. Rated 3.9 out of 5 stars, with 14 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
The Julia Language Handbook
The Julia Language Handbook
The Julia Language Handbook by George Root. Rated 3.9 out of 5 stars, with 12 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Julia programming category.
Creative Capitalism: A Conversation with Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Other Economic Leaders
Creative Capitalism: A Conversation with Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Other Economic Leaders
There are basically two teams in this match of ideas, with several participants trying to referee. On one side are the economists by trade, who are very skeptical about non-market criteria in economics. On the other side are the non-economists who believe the art and science of economics needs to be broadened, but are unclear on how this can be accomplished. Notably, I found the most refreshing approach of the many experts participating in the blog offered by perhaps its youngest contributor – the student Kyle Chauvin – who argued how we need to expand the reach of traditional, or profit, capitalism, not only around the world but to the overlooked corners of the developed world as well.

Unfortunately, the two sides never really converge in this debate and I suppose that may be why the conversation disappeared from public discourse (only 7 reviews?). Both sides accept some common premises that need to be challenged in order to break out of the box we find ourselves in on these issues.

These premises derive from the neoclassical school of economic theory that laid the foundation for general equilibrium theory in macroeconomics. Specifically, actors within the economy are classified according to a loose application of factor analysis, so we have workers, entrepreneurs and small business owners, corporate firms and managers, investors, savers, lenders, borrowers, consumers, and political actors. Then we lump these categories into producers, savers, and investors on one side versus consumers, workers, and borrowers on the other. The consensus seems to settle on the idea that some people produce and so policy should empower this production. Then successful producers can be taxed by political actors, and/or encouraged by philanthropy, to redistribute the wealth to non-producers for reasons that range from compassion to demand stimulus.

Capital accumulation and equity ownership in capitalist enterprise is an essential form of participation in the modern global market economy. Concomitant with ownership is the question of control in governance and risk management as the flip side of profit. But instead of focusing on how wealth is created and distributed through these market structures and institutions, we insist on dividing capital from labor and then try to redistribute the outcomes by political calculus, or by corporate largess. This is industrial age capitalism and such a mode of production will never accomplish what we hope to through creative capitalism. (I do agree with Clive Cook that we need a better term—maybe Inclusive Capitalism or the Singularity, to borrow from Ray Kurzweil.)

The problems that corporate social responsibility (CSR) seeks to address are rooted in the skewed distribution of productive resources across society, widening the gap between the haves and the have-nots. But taxing the haves to give to the have-nots is a self-defeating form of compassion. We should try to adhere to the Chinese proverb about teaching a hungry man to fish so that he eats for a lifetime. This can be put most plainly by asking the following question: If corporations work solely to enrich shareholders, then why aren’t we all shareholders? To widen the economic net even more, why aren’t all enterprise stakeholders shareholders?

Equity participation may also be the most viable way to promote “recognition” as a complement to profit maximization, as stakeholders have a broader range of interests, of which immediate profits is only one. This idea also focuses our attention on the real problem of free societies: agency failures and governance. Market economies depend on a multiplicity of agent-principal relationships in economic enterprises and political institutions. The abuse of these relationships is the mark of cronyism that dominates public attitudes toward “undemocratic” capitalism these days. This is not an easy problem to solve, but suffice to say equity ownership, control, and risk management must be as open, transparent, and competitive as possible. This is the only way to confirm that these relationships are accepted as just.

The only sustainable solution to world poverty and the skewed distribution of resources is the creation of a worldwide, self-sufficient, productive middle class. This is as necessary for democratic politics as it is for economics. For the middle class to grow, it needs access to resources, mostly financial capital and technology these days.

We can point to the history of land homesteading that built the American Midwest, and just recently, the idea floated by Michigan’s governor to promote homesteading in Detroit for foreigners. Society’s resources need to be spread far and wide in order to reap the benefits of innovation and adaptation, while maximizing the utilization of these resources. The financial imperative of capital is to maximize return, but the socioeconomic objective seeks to do so by combining capital with labor. This flies a bit in the face of the efficiency argument that some people are better at managing risk and creating wealth, so specialization of function should favor the risk managers on Wall Street. The problem is that we never know where to find the successful entrepreneurs and job creating small businesses of the future, only those of the past. And Wall St. only considers those who manage to squeeze through the narrow access door.

Without angel capital provided by family relations who merely saved and accumulated their personal wealth, many enterprises would never see the light of day. At the early stages, venture capital money is too costly or unavailable. This story is repeated across the economy, yet today’s concentration of capital in venture firms, hedge funds, private equity, buyout firms, major bank holding companies, etc. narrows capital access to those who already have it. The proliferation of ideas must be forced through this bottleneck, to what end? Better that individuals, families, small group networks, etc. are empowered by policy to accumulate their own capital to put at risk in entrepreneurial ventures. After all, sometimes the idea is not so sexy and may be nothing more than a new restaurant idea or a better mousetrap. In a world where the future is unknown, we can’t lock ourselves into narrow investment models built on the past. Likewise, we should not underestimate the ancillary growth Microsoft seeded by enriching its own shareholders.

The key point, which cannot be overemphasized, is that broad capital accumulation achieves double the impact of other policy options. First, it helps finance ideas, innovation and entrepreneurial risk-taking that will increase labor utilization, spreading the risks and benefits of economic growth. Second, accumulated financial assets, or savings, help mitigate economic risks of unemployment, health, and retirement through self-insurance. This reduces political demands on the state's safety-nets and the tax and redistributive policies on productive effort that hampers economic growth. Essentially, policies that promote broad-based capital accumulation are a win-win for all citizens of a democratic capitalist society.
Growing Money: A Complete Investing Guide for Kids
Growing Money: A Complete Investing Guide for Kids
El libro está en inglés, así que tus hijos deberán tener cierto nivel para seguirlo. Hay algunas cosas que específicas de USA (aparte de que siempre se menciona al dólar y ni a otra moneda), pero en general todo es válido.

Lo suyo es leerlo junto con los críos o, en su defecto, que vayan ellos leyendo un capítulo y que luego pregunten lo que no hayan entendido, haciéndoles a su vez algunas preguntas de control.

Mientras que no haya nada parecido en castellano, es una buena opción.
Finding My Virginity: The New Autobiography
Finding My Virginity: The New Autobiography
This is an interesting book no doubt. Branson is at his best when discussing various companies within his Virgin Group and how they were started, while his descriptions about how he makes business decisions is valuable for both establish business people and budding entrepreneurs. He is at his most dismal, however, when promulgating, in detail and even full chapters, some of his political causes and beliefs which are so left wing that at times it smacks of self indulgence as if he has to describe how liberal and truly open minded he really is. Of course, at the end of the day, life and all of its myriad of issues are a bit more complicated than that. He gives numerous pages to those he claims to have had good relations with and admires (Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama - not unsurprisingly - and those apparently less stellar, Donald Trump for example), but this is not necessary, even if it's true, and detracts from the book - leaving me to wonder where his editor is at times like these.

I also find it a real stretch of the imagination when he described his trip to Vietnam in 2015 and how he “told the crowd” about his "connection" to the country. However, that connection was only as a Vietnam War protester back in the 60's and not even in the US, but in the UK. Since I’ve lived and worked for over 5 years in Vietnam, his assertion is more than a stretch, it's disingenuous.

If Branson would have toned down some of his blatant political rhetoric and also spent a bit less time writing on arbitrary domestic/family issues, it would have made for a smoother, and more insightful - albeit- shorter read. I too, like other reviewers, wish I could ask for a refund, but the time for that has expired.
Great Again: How to Fix Our Crippled America
Great Again: How to Fix Our Crippled America
"I always think big. I start with a plan to build the biggest, the most beautiful, and the highest-quality projects. If you don't begin with big dreams, you can never fulfill them." (Donald Trump, "Great Again: How to Fix Our Crippled America" [Formerly titled Crippled America], Page 166)

The title of this book "Crippled America" had me thinking that this book was going to be a pessimistic view of America and all that is wrong with it. I was wrong. It ended up being answers to the problems facing America. Everything from tax reform, immigration reform, health care reform, "Draining the Swamp" in Washington, bringing back American jobs, improving the economy...Trump knows the issues facing America and thinks he has the answers to fixing them. As president, he now has that opportunity to implement what he wills. He shares what his plans are in this book.

I hear people calling Trump a bigot, racist, etc.; however, I have read every single book that this man has written and not once did I read anything that would cause someone to think these terrible things spoken about him. I think there are some media organizations, special interest groups, lobbyists and of course the Democratic Party who are trying to make Trump look bad to make themselves look better and to hinder the plans he has to make America Great Again. Thankfully, this election proves that Americans are smart and can see past all the biases of the polling and the news. I commend the people of the United States for using their head and their heart and discerning what is best for the American people and not being influenced by these groups. Congrats from a Canadian on electing a person who I believe will shape America for the better. Despite what you hear from some of our Canadian news agencies, some Canadians are very glad to welcome Trump as the now president of the United States.

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